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Very similar to pillar 8 of the TPM, the object of this pillar is to eliminate the causes of accidents.

Introduction

The purpose of this pillar is to be able to eliminate accidents. This involves putting in place an intensive plan for improvements to l’ergonomics, many preventive actions and to design a working environment to avoid potential accidents.

His goal is very similar to pillar 8 of the TPM.

The method

Professor Yamashina proposes a process in 7 steps that are :

N° of step

Name

Description and tools

1

Analyze the causes of accidents

The challenge is to be able to identify root causes. Non-stop and non-stop accidents (see Heinrich pyramid classification).

Like all types of problems treated using the WCM method, investigations will use the same tools :

HERCA / TWTTP, 5G, 5 why, et 7 first tools of quality 

Beyond that, we can use one of the standard methods of problem solving (PDCA…).

2

Set up the countermeasures and deploy them

Once the causes have been identified, we will update or implement the new security standards. We will spend most of the time 5S and Quick Wins.

We will not forget to deploy the solutions horizontally in the same way as the principle of Yokoten.

3

Set up security standards

Through a security matrix, often called matrix S (which links the scene of the incidents and the elements necessary for the security, glasses, glove …), we will make the link between the security problems and the current standards.

4

Conduct general inspections

Through daily management (Gemba Kanri), auditing and specific training, staff must be aware and involved in safety.

5

Independent inspection

At this stage, the staff is autonomous to identify themselves security problems and be proactive on proposals for improvements.

6

Standalone security standard

The staff is autonomous in the validation and updating of security standards.

7

Total security

All personnel from all departments are autonomous in the process. Safety is now a normal, everyday attitude.

 

Source

H. Yamashina (1995) – World Class Manufacturing

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