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The cause-effect matrix evaluates the level of input influence on CTQ. It allows you to filter input to select the 5 to 10 most influential inputs.

Introduction

The cause-effect matrix evaluates the level of input influence on CTQ. It allows you to filter input to select the 5 to 10 most influential inputs.

Step 1: Prepare the document

  1. Copy the Input, in conjunction with the KPOV, into rows by sorting it according to the steps of the Process Map.
  2. Put the CTQ in a column.
  3. Identify the weights of the CTQ according to the result of the VOC.

Step 2: Note the correlations

At the intersection of each CTQ with an Input, identify a correlation level via a notation 0, 1, 3 and 9:

  • 0: There is no correlation
  • 1: Indicates a weak correlation
  • 3: Indicates an average correlation
  • 9: Indicates a strong correlation

Some tips:

  • Team Assessment
  • Each note must obtain a consensus
  • A review of the whole matrix must be done at the end to smooth out the opinions

Step 3: Calculate the Score

For each Input, a score is identified as the sum of the notes products with the weight of the CTQ.

Step 4: Interpreting the results

  1. Scores are close: Review the notes in groups and re-work the notation to bring forward more clearly some Input. If the doubt remains, consider that a score of 235 is no different from a score of 230 or 240.
  2. Build a Pareto chart.
  3. Keep the 5 to 10 Input the most important.
  4. For other Input, set up a gain/cost matrix to select those on which Quick-Wins can be controlled.

The Cause-effect matrix: A matter of experience

Filling the matrix is a process involving common sense experience and a certain quality of judgement. For this reason, the presence of a process expert is necessary. If not, complete the matrix each on its side, then only confront them in groups until consensus is reached.

An example of a Cause-effect matrix

Source

H. Urdhwareshe (2006) – Six Sigma: Converting real life problem in to a statistical problem

J. C. Bongaerts (2008) – Can the Six Sigma method be applied to the process waste generation and treatment

R. Wong (2005) – Project Selection, C & E & FMEA

G. Jing (2006) – Have you found the root cause yet

D. Mokric (2013)-Memory of methodological intelligence

CT Tai (2010) – Using Six Sigma to improve logistics process in a direct selling company

F. Srinivasreddy, S. B. Ikramullah, R. Ahmad (2013) – Six SIGMA implementation to reduce rejection rate of pump casing at local manufacturing company

F. Srinivasreddy, S. B. Ikramullah, R. Ahmad (2013) – Reduction in repair rate of welding processes by determination & controlling of critical KPIVs

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