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Developed by William Gordon and then taken over by Altshuller in the development of TRIZ, this method aims to lift the psychological inertia.

Introduction

Developed by William Gordon and then taken over by Altshuller in the development of TRIZ, this method aims to lift the psychological inertia. The principle of the method is to bring the designer by creating a situation where he is tiny and then sees everything in large. It then performs an infinity magnification of the actual area of contradiction. By this magnification, the designer is then more able to identify, analyze and understand the problem from the inside.

The method

  1. Define the scope of our study
  2. Place one or more miniature men in our area
  3. Ask miniature men to observe the problem
  4. Identify a solution
  5. Ask miniature men to test the solution
  6. Observing the new situation
  7. Transposing the solution in the real situation

 

Example

A car paint specialist is faced with a paint chipping problem for 4×4. Indeed, these are faced with shocks, splashes of gravel…, which slightly distorts the bodywork and causes this scaling. Miniature men are then placed between the bodywork and the outer surface. These “men” will then see the gravel coming on them. How can they protect themselves?

  • Use a shield
  • Increase the number of miniature men to help us
  • Crouching together to cushion the shock

The last solution is held, and the imaginary situation becomes the following:

 

By transposing the solution in the real situation, we can then imagine using a paint with elasticity to cushion the shock and reduce the distortion of the bodywork. The painting then becomes a real skin.

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